Employee vs. Self-Employed: What's Your Work Personality? header image

Employee vs. Self-Employed: What's Your Work Personality?

More than one-third of the U.S. workforce has chosen to become an independent contractor over traditional employment, according to a 2019 Freelancers Union Survey. But being your own boss isn’t always the right fit for everybody. So how do you know if your personality is better suited for a salaried position or a freelance gig? Here, we break down the characteristics that mesh the best with three distinct job styles.

You Should Consider a Salary Role If …

You thrive on team camaraderie, love having a diverse group of coworkers and enjoy team-based projects with monster brainstorming sessions.

Economic uncertainty stresses you out. You like a steady payment schedule that allows you to fine-tune a budget. Benefits and perks matter to you, too.

You like to be challenged at work, but when work’s done for the day, you prefer to leave those stresses behind and enjoy life.

You thrive on a set work schedule and working in a place that’s separate from your home.

Your Next Steps

As someone with traits most suited for a salaried position at a company, you do your best when sharing in the camaraderie of an office setting, having a clear-cut work schedule and tasks and raking in a steady paycheck. You may even thrive in a managerial or leadership position. If you’re not in one now, investigate what it will take to move up at your current organization, or seek out positions elsewhere that work as building blocks to the next level.

You Should Become a Freelancer If …

You like collaborating on large-scale projects, but you prefer to do your portion of the work solo. And you like taking ownership of small projects and seeing them to completion.

You agree that a steady income is nice, but it also makes you feel limited in your earning potential.

You thrive on deadlines and feel empowered when you’re busy. Yet you rely on your hobbies and passions to blow off steam.

You hate the idea of a morning commute and prefer to schedule your work hours in a way that fits around your life. You’re not averse to routine, but you like being able to change it when necessary.

Your Next Steps

You’re a shoo-in to become a freelancer. You’ll channel any stress or anxiety about freelancer uncertainties (like sporadic income) into seeking out clients and doing your best work possible. If you’re not an independent contractor already, think about starting a side-hustle to build up your client base before jumping ship from a nine-to-five job. You might also consider going beyond solopreneurship to running a small business or startup and managing your own team. You might even be a great fit as a Farm Bureau Agent.

You Should Start Your Own Business If …

Leadership and project management is your thing. You like working on long-term endeavors, parsing big projects into smaller tasks and delegating those tasks.

You’re a risk-taker when it comes to money and like to seize opportunities, but you also have a level head for managing cash flow and can see the big picture when it comes to a budget.

Pressure feeds your drive to succeed. But you’re also adept at delegating tasks to alleviate your stress and help empower others at the same time.

 A set schedule helps with organizing your full plate, but you’re flexible when work doesn’t fit into your routine. Work is part of your identity, and you’re willing to make personal sacrifices to succeed.

Your Next Steps

You’re a great candidate to become an entrepreneur. You have the skills and personality needed for creating a business plan and managing all the moving parts of a new venture. You’ll do well with a small crew of sub-contractors or even full-time team members to help you take your dream from concept to fruition. Still not sure? If you’re considering starting a new business, ask yourself these questions to see if you’re financially ready to be your own boss.

Where Do You See Yourself in 5 Years?

Whether you want to build and grow your own business or take on a new role at your company, a Farm Bureau financial advisor can help you plan for a financially secure future.

How can I help you?